RoadWise

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RoadWise
General information
Type: Pilot
Tested system/service:
Countries: The Netherlands  ? test users
 ? partners  ? vehicles
Active from 2005 to 2005
Contact
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There is a threefold objective to the RoadWise pilot project:

  • Demonstrating that presenting traffic management information in the vehicle can occur safely.
  • Demonstrating the interaction between traffic management information and infotainment services in the car, in such a way that traffic safety is not an issue.
  • Gaining insight into what would be needed over time to switch to the introduction of these applications and services.

On completion of the pilot project there should be more insight available within RWS on:

  • the usability of the proposed system concept whereby traffic management and infotainment would be offered in an integrated package;
  • the technical (im)possibilities of the system;
  • the user aspects, particularly the effect of more information in the vehicle in relation to traffic safety (complicating driving tasks);
  • the feasibility of national implementation.

Details of Field Operational Test

Start date and duration of FOT execution

Geographical Coverage

Link with other related Field Operational Tests

Objectives

There is a threefold objective to the RoadWise pilot project:

  • Demonstrating that presenting traffic management information in the vehicle can occur safely.
  • Demonstrating the interaction between traffic management information and infotainment services in the car, in such a way that traffic safety is not an issue.
  • Gaining insight into what would be needed over time to switch to the introduction of these applications and services.

On completion of the pilot project there should be more insight available within RWS on:

  • the usability of the proposed system concept whereby traffic management and infotainment would be offered in an integrated package;
  • the technical (im)possibilities of the system;
  • the user aspects, particularly the effect of more information in the vehicle in relation to traffic safety (complicating driving tasks);
  • the feasibility of national implementation.

Drivers

The ‘driver’ research issue considers attuning new ways of information provision to the desires and possibilities of the road user.

On the basis of the research, at the launch of the RoadWise pilot project it was assumed that:

  1. the driver would like to be better informed while underway (quicker and customised according to time, place, circumstances and user profile);
  2. where possible, he/she would like to use journey times more efficiently (access to possibilities offered by so-called infotainment).

In order to clearly determine who these drivers are and what they are willing to go through to obtain this information, TNS NIPO Consult charted the market strength of traffic management and infotainment services for the period 2005 - 2010.

In a survey carried out on the Internet amongst a large group of Dutch drivers, they were first asked to rank themselves into one of five categories in the Rogers innovation adoption curve:

  • Innovators: bold people, proponents of change, important word-of-mouth advertisers.
  • Early adopters: respectable people, opinion leaders, try out new ideas but in a careful way.
  • Early majority: observant people, careful but they accept change more readily than the average.
  • Late majority: sceptical people, who only use new ideas/products when the majority also does.
  • Laggards: traditional people, who would prefer to maintain ‘the good old times’. They are critical when it comes to new ideas/ products and will only accept a new idea/product if it becomes ‘mainstream’ or tradition.

Results

The first investigation was into the traffic-safe manner of presentation. From this it appeared that the principle of calculating the permitted workload was also actually applied during the test. In certain instances the workload was so high that the safety filter had to cut in to hold back specific information or to display it in another manner. In most instances the driver had such a low workload that most services could be presented at the time it was useful to present them. The fact that the workload management was activated in a third of the cases indicates that such a concept makes sense. Certainly as the driver’s workload increases. In addition it was an important function to only allow distracting issues, such as entering a destination, at extremely low speeds. As already indicated in remains vital to ensure that the criteria applied agree with the driver’s perception. In other words that certain issues are not unjustifiably suppressed or not displayed even though the driver does actually need them.

Lessons learned

Providing information in the car shows great promise. For acceptance of RoadWise information services by end users it is crucial that the information on which these information services are based is up-to-date and reliable.

If the Department of Public Works wishes to deploy in-car traffic management information as a tool to manage the traffic, a change of attitude must first occur amongst drivers. For the time being many regard the information as non-committal. This attitude means compulsory advice is not yet feasible. Ultimately in order to deploy in-car traffic management information as a tool, drivers first need to become familiar with the phenomenon of in-car information. Adding a guiding function to this can then be considered.

The model research has shown that offering traffic management information via in-car information systems can attain benefits. These benefits cover journey times and fuel savings. Journey times will become shorter primarily through better use of the road network thanks to an ongoing re-evaluation of the routes.

At the same time administrative, technological and market-technical preconditions are necessary in order to achieve a successful launch of the information services RoadWise.

In European terms the Netherlands leads acceptance of navigation systems. The navigation market has developed in such a way that only European players can play any significant role. If we accept that it is technically possible to receive the information services via existing route navigation systems, the Department of Public Works needs to bear this in mind if it wants to encourage the market via RoadWise information services.

As an organisation the Department of Public Works is capable of organising the next generation of in-car information services with market parties and knowledge bodies. Based on market estimates the migration is expected to start in 2008-2010, being completed by 2020.

Components of implementation trajectories and scaling possibilities arise from the answers to the research issues. The Department of Public Works, but also other roads administrators (national and international), will need to make a choice as to which combination of components and possibilities will be used to start. The most opportune would appear to be a quick start in which the roads administrator takes the initiative at the EU scale to introduce stimulatory measures for the entire industry (automotive and after-market). In this way commercially attractive and standardised in-car DTM functions could be introduced first by the market.

Main events

Financing

Summary, type of funding and budget

Cooperation partners and contact persons

  • Public Authorities: the Dutch Department of Public Works and Water Management (Rijkswaterstaat, RWS)
  • Industry
    • Vehicle Manufacturer:
    • Supplier:
  • Users:
  • Universities:
  • Research Institutes:
  • Others (specify):

Applications and equipment

Applications tested

Vehicle

Equipment carried by test users

Infrastructure

Test equipment

Methodology

Pre-simulation / Piloting of the FOT

Method for the baseline

Techniques for measurement and data collection

Recruitment goals and methods

Methods for the liaison with the drivers during the FOT execution

Methods for data analysis, evaluation, synthesis and conclusions

Sources of information

Facts about "RoadWise"
Company? +
Contact? +
CountryThe Netherlands +
Ended2005 +
Is type ofPilot +
NameRoadWise +
Started2005 +